Charter offering 60 days of free internet for virtual learning

Destiny Viator

Charter is trying to help families that need internet service for virtual learning this school year

ST. LOUIS — With the coronavirus pandemic forcing schools around the area to utilize remote learning, Charter is offering 60 days of free internet service for families in need.

Charter’s Remote Education Offer provides 60 days of free internet access with speeds up to 200 Mbps. In order to qualify, the household needs to be in a Charter Spectrum market and have a K-12 or college student or a teacher. The offer is only good for customers that do not already have Charter service.

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO.

For more information and to see if you qualify, call 844-310-1198. 

Charter first launched the program in

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Charter relaunches free internet offer for students, educators

LA CROSSE, Wis. (WKBT) – Charter Communications announced Monday it will provide nearly two months of free internet to families of students or educators.

The company has relaunched its Remote Education Offer providing free Spectrum internet – with speeds up to 100 Mbps — and WiFi access for 60 days to households with K-12th graders, college students and/or educators.

The promotion is available for customers who live in a Spectrum market and do not currently have Spectrum enternet services. To enroll, new customers can call (844) 310-1198 and a free self-installation kit will be provided.

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO. “This offer is the latest example of Charter’s ongoing

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Lack of internet access has become critical for students

Destiny Viator

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Educators have worried for years about the “homework gap,” where students without high-speed internet access at home earn lower grades and are less likely to attend college.

Three of the states with the lowest levels of high-speed internet access are in the Deep South: Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi.

As a new school year begins, and the coronavirus pandemic has forced most schools to teach at least partially online, students who lack internet access aren’t just in danger of falling behind — they could be left out.

When the pandemic sent students home in March, many schools scrambled to set up online classes with unfamiliar software for students who often lacked computers. Now, five months later, the schools are prepared and students better equipped, but gaps remain.

‘LEARNING PODS’ IN LOUISANA


Louisiana, like other states across the country, used money from the federal CARES Act to buy

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High school teens kick start Wi-Fi fundraiser for Valley elementary school students

Destiny Viator

The group says as small as an $80 donation will pay for an Alhambra family’s Wi-Fi for the whole school year.

PHOENIX — Coronavirus is still making the return to the classroom a challenge for some Valley schools. 

So when a small group of local teens found out some of those students couldn’t afford internet at home, they started working on a solution.

Neha Balamurugan, Tony and Lauren are the seniors behind the Break Digital Divide program. They’re raising money to help preschool through fourth grade families in the Alhambra Elementary School District pay for internet. 

Mandi Bilyou, the associate superintendent for operations in the Alhambra Elementary School District, said a lot of their families struggle to pay for Wi-Fi.

“It’s definitely a hardship and a choice they have to make between taking care of their daily needs and/or purchasing internet,” Bilyou said.

The need in their school community was

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Activists called for Comcast and other providers to guarantee faster, free internet for students

Destiny Viator

Genesis Mejia-Noyer takes her studies seriously.



a group of people walking in front of a building: Parents pick up Chromebooks for virtual instruction at the Philadelphia School District headquarters in April.


© MONICA HERNDON/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Parents pick up Chromebooks for virtual instruction at the Philadelphia School District headquarters in April.

But, she said, her internet connection is too slow and unreliable. When she and her two siblings try to access Zoom or Google Classroom simultaneously, one or all is invariably kicked offline, or coping with frozen screens and unable to effectively ask teachers questions. Mejia-Noyer said she often has to wait minutes to get reconnected or must use her phone’s data plan to complete schoolwork.

“It happens multiple times during the school day, which is the main reason I feel distracted,” said Mejia-Noyer, a junior at Kensington Health Sciences Academy in Philadelphia. “I worry that if I don’t have access to stable internet soon, this situation will affect my future.”

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Mejia-Noyer joined students, teachers, politicians

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Charter relaunches free Spectrum Internet offer for students and educators

Destiny Viator

LINCOLN, Neb. (KOLN) – Charter Communications, Inc. announced on Monday a relaunch of its Remote Education Offer providing free Spectrum Internet and WiFi access for 60 days to households with K-12th graders, college students and/or educators. The promotion is available for customers who live in a Spectrum market and do not currently have Spectrum Internet services.



a van parked on the side of a road: KOLN


© Provided by Lincoln & Hastings-Krny KOLN
KOLN

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO. “This offer is the latest example of Charter’s ongoing commitment to improving access to broadband and helping to ease the strain of the pandemic in the communities we serve.”

Charter first offered its Remote Education Offer in March, resulting in 448,000 new households added through June 30, 2020 to Charter’s Spectrum Internet for

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Opinion: Lack of Internet Access Will Haunt California’s Poorest Students

Destiny Viator

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A widely circulated photo of two young girls in Salinas relying on Taco Bell’s wifi for their education. Image from Instagram

By Raoul Lowery Contreras

K-12 students residing in places like Calabasas, Brentwood, Beverly Hills, San Marino, La Jolla, Del Mar, Rancho Santa Fe, Carmel, Burlingame and Marin County are the luckiest kids in California. 

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Although the effects of COVID-19 have been widespread, the underserved communities of the state have felt the impacts more acutely than wealthy neighborhoods. Schools remaining closed this fall will only exacerbate the negative effects of the pandemic.

Wealthy families don’t need the free or reduced-cost meals that California schools serve, nor are they dependent upon school nurses for medical attention. The harsh reality is that these well-off zip codes are not dependent on schools being open to have their basic

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How schools are creating internet hotspots for students in the era of remote learning

Destiny Viator

After providing Wi-Fi buses for students at the end of last school year, many school districts are finding new ways to keep kids connected. (Photo: Getty Creative stock photo)
After providing Wi-Fi buses for students at the end of last school year, many school districts are finding new ways to keep kids connected. (Photo: Getty Creative stock photo)

With this unprecedented school year just beginning, many districts across the country have had to figure out ways to ensure their students remain connected.

According to a June study done by Common Sense Media and Boston Consulting Group, about 15 to 16 million K-12 public school students have no access to internet, or devices equipped for distance learning at home. A viral picture of two students doing school work outside of a Taco Bell in Salinas, Calif. last month further illustrated the digital equity gap.

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Ed Markey, Boston Teachers Union push for more internet access for students learning at home amid coronavirus

Destiny Viator

There’s no school this fall without the internet, but as remote learning gets underway in districts across Massachusetts and kicks off in Boston on Monday, not every student has access to a network.

“Right now we’re trying to connect students with 60- or 90-day free trials with Wi-Fi access. But what happens after those free trials end?” Boston Teachers Union president Jessica Tang said on Friday.

Even among students who do have access to the internet, some have such poor connections that they’re “dropping in and out,” she added. “Obviously that’s a major disruption to remote learning.”

U.S. Sen. Edward Markey is calling for $4 billion in the next round of coronavirus relief funding to change that.

“The internet is like oxygen for young people and their education,” Markey said Friday, appearing with Tang outside the Boston Teachers Union Pilot School in Jamaica Plain. “If the internet is not made

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Is It Time For The Internet To Be A School-Managed Public Utility?

Destiny Viator

School has opened across the country, but in many districts that means class via internet—if those students are among those fortunate enough to have access to fast, large-capacity internet connections.

How many aren’t connected? The answer is that nobody’s exactly sure. One study says that 33 million citizens live without the net. The FCC says that 19 million Americans lack access to broadband at threshold speeds; they also say that 99.99% of the US population has access to some kind of internet. None of the surveys really capture the picture on the ground. Here’s a house that has a good internet connect—except when it rains. Here’s a home where the connection is good—unless five people have to connect their devices at the same time.

So as schools shift to online education, we have more tales of students sitting in parking lots to grab the wi-fi. Schools (and

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