Charter offering 60 days of free internet for virtual learning

Destiny Viator

Charter is trying to help families that need internet service for virtual learning this school year

ST. LOUIS — With the coronavirus pandemic forcing schools around the area to utilize remote learning, Charter is offering 60 days of free internet service for families in need.

Charter’s Remote Education Offer provides 60 days of free internet access with speeds up to 200 Mbps. In order to qualify, the household needs to be in a Charter Spectrum market and have a K-12 or college student or a teacher. The offer is only good for customers that do not already have Charter service.

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO.

For more information and to see if you qualify, call 844-310-1198. 

Charter first launched the program in

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Metro LGUs to distribute gadgets for distance learning

Destiny Viator


Metro LGUs to distribute gadgets for distance learning

(The Philippine Star) – September 25, 2020 – 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — Local governments in Metro Manila will begin distributing next week gadgets for the distance learning of students ahead of the opening of classes in public schools on Oct. 5.

Pasig Mayor Vico Sotto yesterday said the first batch of 20,000 computer tablets procured by the city government are being inspected prior to distribution on Sept. 30.

“The gadgets are under inspection as part of quality control to make sure that these are in proper condition before we distribute the items to public schools,” Sotto said in a statement.

Pasig purchased at least 138,000 tablets worth P1.3 billion to be used by public school students and teachers for distance learning as face-to-face classes have been suspended due to the risks of coronavirus.

“They will receive their tablets on Oct. 1

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What Students And Instructors Should Know About Virtual Learning Technology

Destiny Viator

Sam Liang, CEO and co-founder, Otter.ai

In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, just about every sector of society has undergone profound changes. The shift has been especially significant for students and teachers. Less than a year ago, only 38% of teachers said they used a blended or hybrid course format for teaching. In the blink of an eye in March 2020, universities and community colleges scrambled to transition to an almost 100% remote learning setup. Educators saw the adoption of video tools like Zoom, Google Meet and Microsoft Teams skyrocket as a result — initially as an interim measure until the spread of the virus slowed and schools reopened.

The realization now, of course, is that the pandemic has accelerated a dramatic shift toward remote learning. I’ve spent a lot of time exploring the benefits of tools like videoconferencing software as I’ve worked on new features to add

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Helping students, parents and teachers cope with virtual learning

Destiny Viator

Emotional Reintegration is a program to help adapt to a new normal with virtual learning as anxiety overload causes stress on students and parents this school year.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The beginning of a new school year is a stressful time for almost everyone. But when you add in a pandemic, virtual classes, technology problems, and social distancing it’s anxiety overload for both parents and students alike.

“We’re helping them deal with what’s going on right now real-time and emotionally,” Dr. Gigi Hamilton said.

Gigi Hamilton, founder of Personal Enrichment Counseling & Consulting Services in Charlotte, and Sherry Latten of Latten & Associates created the Emotional Reintegration program.

“It’s designed to help deal with emotions that people have gone through since March,” Dr. Hamilton said.

The three-hour program guides administrators, teachers, and students of all ages through a multi-step process that includes Acknowledging, Reconnecting, and Cultivating.

“It’s highly interactive it’s

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How schools are creating internet hotspots for students in the era of remote learning

Destiny Viator

After providing Wi-Fi buses for students at the end of last school year, many school districts are finding new ways to keep kids connected. (Photo: Getty Creative stock photo)
After providing Wi-Fi buses for students at the end of last school year, many school districts are finding new ways to keep kids connected. (Photo: Getty Creative stock photo)

With this unprecedented school year just beginning, many districts across the country have had to figure out ways to ensure their students remain connected.

According to a June study done by Common Sense Media and Boston Consulting Group, about 15 to 16 million K-12 public school students have no access to internet, or devices equipped for distance learning at home. A viral picture of two students doing school work outside of a Taco Bell in Salinas, Calif. last month further illustrated the digital equity gap.

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After six months of remote learning, tech for students still a work in progress, limited by funding | Education

Destiny Viator

The shift to remote learning over a weekend in March meant Manchester had to make sure every student had a computer to use for schoolwork.

Six months later, it’s still a work in progress, said Stephen Cross, the school district’s chief information officer.

At the beginning of 2020, Manchester was a “two-to-one” district — two students to one computer, he said. Cross had replaced thousands of outdated laptops before the pandemic and has purchased thousands more, but some students are still waiting.

“We have 3,100 Chromebooks on order, and we have no idea when we’re going to get those,” he said. 

Some schools had a surplus of Chromebooks, so Cross engineered a way to loan some of those schools’ devices to other schools.

“That’s how we’ve been getting devices into the hands of families, moving things around,” Cross said. “We had to scrounge. It was ‘do whatever we can,’ to

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Ed Markey, Boston Teachers Union push for more internet access for students learning at home amid coronavirus

Destiny Viator

There’s no school this fall without the internet, but as remote learning gets underway in districts across Massachusetts and kicks off in Boston on Monday, not every student has access to a network.

“Right now we’re trying to connect students with 60- or 90-day free trials with Wi-Fi access. But what happens after those free trials end?” Boston Teachers Union president Jessica Tang said on Friday.

Even among students who do have access to the internet, some have such poor connections that they’re “dropping in and out,” she added. “Obviously that’s a major disruption to remote learning.”

U.S. Sen. Edward Markey is calling for $4 billion in the next round of coronavirus relief funding to change that.

“The internet is like oxygen for young people and their education,” Markey said Friday, appearing with Tang outside the Boston Teachers Union Pilot School in Jamaica Plain. “If the internet is not made

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Apex Learning Announces Collaboration with PowerSchool to Streamline Digital Curriculum Integrations for Students and Educators

Destiny Viator

Collaboration supports simplified access to comprehensive online learning

SEATTLE, Sept. 17, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Apex Learning, a recognized leader in online learning, announces a new collaboration with PowerSchool, a leading provider of K-12 education technology solutions. The collaboration will strengthen the company’s commitment to streamlined teaching and learning, enabling educators to seamlessly integrate Apex Learning digital curriculum with Schoology Learning, PowerSchool’s learning management system. Students, teachers, parents and administrators will be able to engage with one platform for communication, collaboration and to provide access to digital curriculum.

An industry leader in online education with deep expertise in digital curriculum, Apex Learning works closely with school districts across the country to provide implementation solutions that close learning gaps and increase on-time graduation rates. From struggling to accelerated, Apex Learning creates opportunities for students to succeed through virtual, hybrid and in-classroom learning options.    

“We recognize that seamless integration of digital tools

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First of 82,000 devices purchased by Connecticut for needy students learning from home will begin arriving this month

Destiny Viator

Connecticut school districts will soon begin receiving tens of thousands of laptops for students in need through the state’s Everybody Learns initiative.

Announced in July, the program seeks to end the state’s digital divide and improve online learning by providing families who do not have adequate access to devices and connectivity with new laptops and home high-speed internet.

“From the beginning of this pandemic, we knew that our state had an obligation to tens of thousands of school children around Connecticut to make sure they had the tools necessary to further their educations, as we didn’t know how long this public health emergency would last,” Gov. Ned Lamont said in a news release Tuesday. “Now, our students are in a position where they have the tools necessary to participate and engage with this technology, and we can keep as many students as possible connected throughout this school year.”

In

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Chicago Public Schools begins a new year amid scramble to get all students connected for remote learning

Destiny Viator

Surrounded by four computer monitors, Nightingale Elementary teacher Lauren Kullman joked that she felt like she was producing the Emmys. But it was just the first day of school.



Javier Lopez, 8, a Chicago Public School student at Skinner North Classical Elementary School, raises his hand to answer a question on the first day of remote learning at his Chicago home Tuesday.


© Jos M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Javier Lopez, 8, a Chicago Public School student at Skinner North Classical Elementary School, raises his hand to answer a question on the first day of remote learning at his Chicago home Tuesday.

As Chicago Public Schools on Tuesday began fall quarter with remote learning, most educators were teaching from their homes, though some went to school buildings in order to stream lessons from their classrooms.

Kullman is married to a special education teacher, and the couple has a 5-year-old starting kindergarten along with a younger child.

“Our house is embracing the chaos,” she said Tuesday. “… We are just so grateful that we are remote. The challenges we will face are

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