Making both our teachers and students future-ready

Destiny Viator



a person sitting at a desk in front of a computer: In most online classes, a child is usually immobile. This is not very different from a child sitting in a traditional classroom.


© Provided by The Financial Express
In most online classes, a child is usually immobile. This is not very different from a child sitting in a traditional classroom.

By Noora Noushad

About 65% of children entering primary schools may end up working in job types that don’t yet exist-in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the skills needed are innovation, design thinking, technological fluency, heightened social emotional learning. The future of work is ever-evolving-right now coding is the new literacy, it could be machine learning tomorrow and bioinformatics or epistemic cognition the day after. The only thing we can do is build students’ ability to thrive in a world of constant change.

In the age of technology in education (edtech), we need to place education ahead of technology-go back to the drawing board to see where tech can truly influence educational outcomes. Adaptive learning is good, but great content comes first. Gamification

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Provide gadgets, internet to poor students: HC to schools

Destiny Viator

New Delhi: The Delhi high court on Friday directed private as well as government schools to provide gadgets and an internet package to poor students for online classes, saying the absence of such facilities prevent children from pursuing elementary education.

A bench of Justices Manmohan and Sanjeev Narula said private unaided schools ‘shall be entitled to claim reimbursement of reasonable cost for procurement of the equipment and internet package from the State under the Right to Education (RTE) Act, 2009, even though the State is not providing the same to its students’.

The bench directed constitution of a three-member committee, comprising education secretary from the Centre or his nominee, Delhi government’s education secretary or his nominee and a representative of the private schools, to expedite and streamline the process of identifying and supplying the gadgets to poor and disadvantaged students.

The court said the committee shall also frame standard

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Sarasota teachers unhappy teaching in-person and remote students

Ryan McKinnon
 
| Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Teachers in the Sarasota County School District are widely dissatisfied with a new requirement for them to provide both in-person and remote instruction, and district leaders are working on adding preparation time for teachers into the school calendar in the coming months in response.

Surveys conducted by both the teachers’ union and the School District showed that teachers feel overworked. On Tuesday, district spokesman Craig Maniglia confirmed that the administration was working on plans to give students one day off in October and November to allow teachers more time to prepare.

“The majority of the problems we are hearing is they don’t have the physical time to do this,” said Sarasota Classified/Teachers Association President Pat Gardner said. “They are working nights, Saturdays, Sundays, not even seeing their own kids anymore.”

Administrators developed the new model, referred to as “concurrent instruction,” over the summer to provide

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PNC donates $250,000 to Cleveland students to help fund computers, internet access for students

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WJW) – One of the biggest struggles for many remote learners is internet access and computers to do schoolwork.

PNC and the PNC Foundation is giving $250,000 to the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, East Cleveland City Schools, Breakthrough Public Schools, and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Northeast Ohio to help with remote learning expenses.

CMSD plans to use its donation to help buy digital connectivity equipment for students who don’t have the tools for remote learning.

The Boys and Girls Clubs is focusing on investing in a program they have to help tutor remote learners.

Breakthrough Public Schools will be getting hotspots and equipment, and East Cleveland will do the same.  

“The pandemic has presented unique challenges to all schools, but especially those districts that

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Charter relaunches free internet offer for students, educators

LA CROSSE, Wis. (WKBT) – Charter Communications announced Monday it will provide nearly two months of free internet to families of students or educators.

The company has relaunched its Remote Education Offer providing free Spectrum internet – with speeds up to 100 Mbps — and WiFi access for 60 days to households with K-12th graders, college students and/or educators.

The promotion is available for customers who live in a Spectrum market and do not currently have Spectrum enternet services. To enroll, new customers can call (844) 310-1198 and a free self-installation kit will be provided.

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO. “This offer is the latest example of Charter’s ongoing

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Manila to buy 27,000 more computer tablets for students enrolled in public schools

The local government of Manila will buy 27,200 more tablet computers to ensure that all the city’s public school students will have gadgets to use for the upcoming blended learning system.

Manila Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso (Manila City Public Information Office / MANILA BULLETIN FILE PHOTO)

In his Facebook video message Friday night, Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso said they ordered more computers as the city only initially ordered about 110,000 tablets.  There are 275,000 students enrolled in Manila public schools this year.

“Because the number of our enrollees ballooned, we held a meeting again with our school board and decided to buy 27,200 more tablets. So, in total, the city will have acquired 137,200 tablets,” Domagoso said in Filipino.

He clarified that each household— not each student—will get a tablet to make sure that everyone is covered.

“Ang solusyon na ginawa ay bawat household o sa Tagalog, bawat

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Lack of internet access has become critical for students

Destiny Viator

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Educators have worried for years about the “homework gap,” where students without high-speed internet access at home earn lower grades and are less likely to attend college.

Three of the states with the lowest levels of high-speed internet access are in the Deep South: Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi.

As a new school year begins, and the coronavirus pandemic has forced most schools to teach at least partially online, students who lack internet access aren’t just in danger of falling behind — they could be left out.

When the pandemic sent students home in March, many schools scrambled to set up online classes with unfamiliar software for students who often lacked computers. Now, five months later, the schools are prepared and students better equipped, but gaps remain.

‘LEARNING PODS’ IN LOUISANA


Louisiana, like other states across the country, used money from the federal CARES Act to buy

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Lito Lapid files bill creating second-hand gadgets donation program for Pinoy students

Destiny Viator



Lito Lapid wearing a suit and tie: Sen. Lito Lapid asks Education officials during the Committee on Basic Education, Arts and Culture hybrid hearing, Thursday, June 25, 2020, about the cost of implementing the basic education learning continuity plan under the new normal. “What would be the cost if all students in public schools will be given tablets? What would be the cost of printing self-learning modules?” Lapid asked. Education officials replied that a committee has already been formed to study the matter. (Screen grab/Senate PRIB)


© Screen grab/Senate PRIB
Sen. Lito Lapid asks Education officials during the Committee on Basic Education, Arts and Culture hybrid hearing, Thursday, June 25, 2020, about the cost of implementing the basic education learning continuity plan under the new normal. “What would be the cost if all students in public schools will be given tablets? What would be the cost of printing self-learning modules?” Lapid asked. Education officials replied that a committee has already been formed to study the matter. (Screen grab/Senate PRIB)

Senator Manuel “Lito” Lapid has filed a bill seeking to establish an electronics donation and recycling program in the Philippines to manage e-waste and bridge the digital divide among Filipino students amid the shift to distance learning.

Senate Bill No. 1846 or the Electronics Donation Recycling Act requires all manufacturers and retailers of electronic gadgets to set up donation and recycling booths in their sales outlets, stores,

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Email app Superhuman adds a cheaper plan for students and teachers

Destiny Viator



Superhuman for Education


Superhuman for Education

Premium email client Superhuman has introduced a cheaper plan for teachers and students. Superhuman for Education costs $10 per month instead of the usual $30, and it’s open to those with active school email addresses.

Superhuman is all about helping people to zip through their inbox “twice as fast,” according to the company. It offers features including a calendar built into your inbox, timed reminders to follow up on emails and send later options.

In addition, Superhuman has a split inbox function, which it says allows people to “organize their inbox by class, extracurricular activities, important contacts, or tools, such as Google Docs.” It also draws insights about

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Burlington City distributes more laptops to students

Destiny Viator

BURLINGTON CITY, New Jersey (WPVI) — Students across New Jersey began a new school earlier this month relying on remote or hybrid schedules to reduce the spread of the coronavirus. But many students in the Burlington City school system still need computers.

Siobhan Moody has three kids in the Burlington City school system. Two of them are high school students who’ve spent the first two weeks of the school year learning on their smartphones.

“It’s been crazy, kind of hard to learn for school,” said Moody.

“And some stuff you can’t do on the phone,” added her daughter, freshman Yanaiah Jones.

That struggle ends Wednesday night. The district handed out another several dozen laptops to students who still didn’t have the school device.

“Our laptops have been slow to come in. As soon as they come in we’re rolling them back out,” said Superintendent John Russell with the City of

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