Tech company Asurion offers free tech support hotline for Rutherford students, teachers doing virtual learning

Destiny Viator

With thousands of students and teachers online this semester, technology problems can quickly lead to a host of issues for students trying to access academic instruction and teachers leading classrooms. Rutherford County Schools Director Bill Spurlock talks about distance learning Click to expand UP NEXT Nashville-based global tech company Asurion […]

With thousands of students and teachers online this semester, technology problems can quickly lead to a host of issues for students trying to access academic instruction and teachers leading classrooms.

Rutherford County Schools Director Bill Spurlock talks about distance learning

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Nashville-based global tech company Asurion launched its own “Tech Sanity Hotline” this week to help ensure teachers, students and parents can stay connected.

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Many students in Rutherford County have been learning remotely from home since the school year began.

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Back to school: From home schooling to co-ops, students are learning in new ways

Roughly 48% of Murfreesboro City Schools students are participating in distance learning until October. Grades 3-6 were required to learn from home unless an exemption was approved. For Rutherford County Schools, about 20,000 students in all grades started the year with virtual learning for at least the first nine weeks, but the district allowed families to work with their child’s school to alter arrangements. RCS has set a final deadline of Thursday for changes in learning formats.



a man standing in front of a computer: Bienfait Alimasi, a second grader at Salem Elementary, talks with his teacher on Zoom. He is distance learning for the first nine weeks of school.


© Submitted
Bienfait Alimasi, a second grader at Salem Elementary, talks with his teacher on Zoom. He is distance learning for the first nine weeks of school.

At least 1 in 4 Tennessee students are learning online, and as many families saw on the first day of school, tech woes can have a significant impact. 



a stack of flyers on a table: A weekly schedule for Malik Gordon’s virtual learning hangs near his study area in his home on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020.


© Mark Zaleski/For The Tennessean
A weekly schedule for Malik Gordon’s virtual learning hangs near his study area in his home on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020.

“A quick look across social media and parents’ groups, and you see how parents and teachers are struggling. The tech challenges really hit home, with one parent even offering to pay someone to log their kids in each morning,” said Sarah Day, vice president of marketing at Asurion, in a news release. “This is what Asurion does every day through our Home+ service. We have thousands of experts helping people.  We understand that many parents and teachers aren’t tech experts, and our team can make sure tech is working for our hometown students and teachers.”

Students, teachers and parents can visit Asurion.com/SchoolTechHelp or call 1-866-463-3773 six days a week (Monday through Saturday) from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. for free help with any home tech issues.

Experts will be available to assist with how-to instructions, questions and tips for boosting your internet connection, using WiFi hot spots, troubleshooting slow internet speeds and adding parental controls to a laptop or tablet.

Families can also take advantage of a special partnership with nine uBreakiFix stores that are offering free diagnostic reviews and discounts off laptop, computer or tablet repairs through fall break.

For more information, visit Asurion.com/SchoolTechHelp.

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Meghan Mangrum covers education in Nashville for the USA TODAY NETWORK — Tennessee. Contact her at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @memangrum.

This article originally appeared on Nashville Tennessean: Tech company Asurion offers free tech support hotline for Rutherford students, teachers doing virtual learning

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