MPSD purchases new technology for students and teachers

Destiny Viator

MERIDIAN, Miss. (WTOK) – The Meridian Public School District will be getting extra help making distance learning possible for all students. Funds from the CARES Act and the Equity in Distance Learning Act are being used to purchase new devices for students and teachers.



a person holding a book: MPSD to receive new technology


© Provided by Meridian WTOK-TV
MPSD to receive new technology

“I’m expecting [the new technology] in the next 30-days,” said Tim Boutwell, the director of technology for the Meridian Public School District. “The devices have been ordered a couple weeks ago now, so 30 days gives me about 6 weeks leeway. So I’m expecting them in the next 30 days.”

K-1 students will be receiving iPads and students in other grades will be receiving Chromebooks. Teachers who have not recently been given new laptops will be getting new ones with the funds.

“If we had to close on a moment’s notice for any purpose, you

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West Luray Recreation Center holds Wednesday study hall with computer, WiFi access for students

Destiny Viator

PAGE COUNTY, Va. (WHSV) – After three years of work and renovations, the West Luray Recreation Center opened in mid-September, and organizers there are already working to help children in the community.



a sign on the side of a building: The West Luray Recreation Center is offering students in the community access to a computer lab, WiFi, and tutors.


© Provided by Harrisonburg WHSV
The West Luray Recreation Center is offering students in the community access to a computer lab, WiFi, and tutors.

Tutors, mentors, and chaperones are available to help students with their schoolwork on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The rec center’s founder Audre King said their facility can safely socially distance about 50 children. There are computers, WiFi, and access to recreational activities available for students.

Based on community support, King said he thinks the center can help students more days of the week with schoolwork.

“Since our opening, we’ve had so many retired teachers and people within the community that said, ‘We want to help,’ so as we staff up

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The Federal Government Promised Native American Students Computers and Internet. Many Are Still Waiting.

Destiny Viator

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This story was co-published with The Arizona Republic, a member of the ProPublica Local Reporting Network.

Aubrie Sloan expected to start sixth grade in a virtual classroom where she would learn from her teacher each day and engage with classmates for the first time since the coronavirus forced her school to close in March.

Instead, she marks her attendance at Kaibeto Boarding School, on the western side of the Navajo Nation, by texting or calling her teacher each morning. Then she dives into paper packets the school delivers to her home, breezing through assignments that her mother says aren’t a challenge because she already knows the material.

Aside from two phone calls from her teacher, the 11-year-old has received little

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DepEd to discourage use of printed modules by students with smartphones, gadgets

Destiny Viator



a group of people sitting at a table: Teachers from the Geronimo Santiago Elementary School in San Miguel, Manila on Monday, July 6, 2020, sort out mathematics modules to be used by elementary pupils for School Year 2020-2021. The Department of Education said the school year will start on August 24, but no face-to-face classes will be held as ordered by President Rodrigo Duterte. DANNY PATA


© Danny Pata
Teachers from the Geronimo Santiago Elementary School in San Miguel, Manila on Monday, July 6, 2020, sort out mathematics modules to be used by elementary pupils for School Year 2020-2021. The Department of Education said the school year will start on August 24, but no face-to-face classes will be held as ordered by President Rodrigo Duterte. DANNY PATA

The Department of Education (DepEd) will discourage students with smartphones or other gadgets to choose the use of self-learning modules possibly starting on the second quarter of upcoming school year.

In a press conference on Monday, DepEd Undersecretary Diosdado Antonio said that 59% of the 22 million students enrolled in public schools or almost 13 million learners preferred the use of the printed lessons.

“Sa first quarter, sinubok natin na tugunan ‘yung mga preferences ng mga pamilya kaya popular ‘yung printed self-learning modules,” San Antonio said.

“Pero, ang pinu-push

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Covid-19 skin rash website criticised for lack of BAME examples

Destiny Viator

A website dedicated to sharing images of Covid-19 related skin rashes to help doctors and patients identify whether an unusual rash might be a sign of coronavirus infection has been criticised for containing just two images of black or brown skin.

The British Association of Dermatologists’ (BAD) Covid-19 Skin Patterns website features 400 images of Covid-associated rashes, from prickly heat and chickenpox-type rashes, to raised itchy hives, and chilblain-like ‘Covid fingers and toes’. They were gathered by the Covid Symptom Study app in response to growing evidence that skin rashes are a key feature of the disease, present in around 9% of app users testing positive for Covid-19. In children they may be even more predictive, with a sixth of children experiencing a rash and no other symptoms.

Related: Rashes, headaches, tingling: the less common coronavirus symptoms that patients have

“Being able to recognise these is crucial for reducing the

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Making both our teachers and students future-ready

Destiny Viator



a person sitting at a desk in front of a computer: In most online classes, a child is usually immobile. This is not very different from a child sitting in a traditional classroom.


© Provided by The Financial Express
In most online classes, a child is usually immobile. This is not very different from a child sitting in a traditional classroom.

By Noora Noushad

About 65% of children entering primary schools may end up working in job types that don’t yet exist-in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the skills needed are innovation, design thinking, technological fluency, heightened social emotional learning. The future of work is ever-evolving-right now coding is the new literacy, it could be machine learning tomorrow and bioinformatics or epistemic cognition the day after. The only thing we can do is build students’ ability to thrive in a world of constant change.

In the age of technology in education (edtech), we need to place education ahead of technology-go back to the drawing board to see where tech can truly influence educational outcomes. Adaptive learning is good, but great content comes first. Gamification

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K-12 schools scramble for tech equipment this fall

Destiny Viator

Tens of millions of students across the U.S. risk falling farther behind this fall as schools struggle to secure the technology needed to effectively teach online.

The state of play: Many schools across the country ordered child-friendly technology like Lenovo Chromebooks in the spring to continue classes virtually in the fall. But, order backlogs are pushing some arrival dates to as late as October.

Driving the news: The world’s three biggest computer companies, Lenovo, HP and Dell, said they have a shortage of nearly 5 million laptops, per AP.

  • Experts credit their manufacturing and distribution slowdowns in China to virus-related disruptions, trade agreements with the U.S. and sanctions for alleged human rights abuses.
  • “Keeping students learning is our top priority and we are treating every school and school district with urgency. The pandemic and shift to remote learning has increased the need for devices, and we are working hard to 
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Charter offering 60 days of free internet for virtual learning

Destiny Viator

Charter is trying to help families that need internet service for virtual learning this school year

ST. LOUIS — With the coronavirus pandemic forcing schools around the area to utilize remote learning, Charter is offering 60 days of free internet service for families in need.

Charter’s Remote Education Offer provides 60 days of free internet access with speeds up to 200 Mbps. In order to qualify, the household needs to be in a Charter Spectrum market and have a K-12 or college student or a teacher. The offer is only good for customers that do not already have Charter service.

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO.

For more information and to see if you qualify, call 844-310-1198. 

Charter first launched the program in

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Provide gadgets, internet to poor students: HC to schools

Destiny Viator

New Delhi: The Delhi high court on Friday directed private as well as government schools to provide gadgets and an internet package to poor students for online classes, saying the absence of such facilities prevent children from pursuing elementary education.

A bench of Justices Manmohan and Sanjeev Narula said private unaided schools ‘shall be entitled to claim reimbursement of reasonable cost for procurement of the equipment and internet package from the State under the Right to Education (RTE) Act, 2009, even though the State is not providing the same to its students’.

The bench directed constitution of a three-member committee, comprising education secretary from the Centre or his nominee, Delhi government’s education secretary or his nominee and a representative of the private schools, to expedite and streamline the process of identifying and supplying the gadgets to poor and disadvantaged students.

The court said the committee shall also frame standard

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This website helps people with illnesses and disabilities participate in Black Lives Matter protests

Destiny Viator

Three artists have partnered to launch a digital platform that allows people unable to march in the streets to participate in Black Lives Matter protests.



many booth in a store: Black Lives Matter activists protesting online through Public Public Address.


© Courtesy Public_Public_Address
Black Lives Matter activists protesting online through Public Public Address.

High-profile killings of several Black people by police sparked nationwide protests this summer, with marchers demanding police reform and racial justice.

Jason Lazarus, Siebren Versteeg and Stephanie Syjuco founded Public Public Address on September 1 to help people with illnesses and disabilities participate in these protests and make their voices heard without putting their lives at risk.

“This is all about our solidarity with Black Lives Matter. We want people to be a part of the movement whether they can protest on the streets or not,” Lazarus told CNN. “Our goal is battling systemic racism and violence and bringing all kinds of people along with us.”

Public Public Address urges people

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