‘Are you kidding me right now?’

Destiny Viator

A high school student has been wreaking havoc among his teachers with a $16 gadget that can supposedly tell whether a diamond is real. The TikTok star on the rise, known as DiamondTesterKid, uploaded his first video in a now-eight-part series on Sept. 21. In the now-viral clip, which has been […]

A high school student has been wreaking havoc among his teachers with a $16 gadget that can supposedly tell whether a diamond is real.

The TikTok star on the rise, known as DiamondTesterKid, uploaded his first video in a now-eight-part series on Sept. 21.

In the now-viral clip, which has been viewed over 4.9M times, the teen uses a Diamond Selector II to test if one of his teacher’s wedding rings is a real diamond or a simulant stone, such as cubic zirconium. (To be clear — there’s nothing wrong with a non-diamond ring! It’s just that you probably should not lie to your future betrothed on the very day you get engaged.)

“You think it’s real?” the TikToker asks his unsuspecting teacher.

“Yeah, of course!” she replies.

“Let me test it,” says the teen, before touching the tip of the Diamond Selector II to the ring’s large center stone.

Unfortunately, the tool determines the stone is not a real diamond, which, naturally, the teacher does not seem too thrilled about.

In another one of DiamondTesterKid’s videos, which has been viewed over 9.7M times, the teen enters another one of his teacher’s classrooms to put her ring to the test.

“Hey hey, Miss T!” he says. “You married, right?”

After she says yes and confirms she is wearing her wedding ring, the teen asks her if she thinks it’s real.

“I hope so…” she replies.

Sadly for Miss T, the device rules her ring to be a fake. She did not seem very happy about the experiment in a subsequent call to her husband.

“I got this kid in my room telling me that my ring isn’t real,” she said on the call, which was slyly captured by the TikToker. “Are you kidding me right now? Is it real or is it not real?”

Thankfully, not every one of the diamond testing clips showcases a loss — in one of the videos, a teacher puts forth three of her rings and a bracelet, and three of the items end up being detected as genuine diamonds. (One of the rings appears to be a semiprecious stone like aquamarine, which the tool does not claim to be able to detect.)

Still, TikTok users are truly shaken by the video series, with many expressing concern over the future of the teachers’ marriages.

“You the reason why they getting divorced,” one user wrote.

“Why’d you expose her husband like that,” commented another.

“YOU JUST ENDED A MARRIAGE!!” said a third.

Despite how stressful the videos are to watch, there still may be a silver lining here. According to one TikToker who said she used to work at a jewelry store, tools like the Diamond Selector II can be finicky and may “only give accurate results” under certain conditions.

“I’m not saying that it won’t work, it just will not give you the most accurate results,” the user commented. “There’s also a certain way you have to hold the diamond tester.”

So, for the sake of all of his teachers and their husbands, we certainly hope DiamondTesterKid is merely holding the device wrong.

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